Ethics in Dialysis

Ethics in Dialysis


Information and resources on ethics will be posted here for staff information.

Ethical Considerations in Refusal of Consent for Routine Vital Sign Monitoring During Dialysis:

Application of the WRHA’s Ethical Decision‐Making Framework for clinical decisions can provide support to discussions about refusal of consent for routine vital sign monitoring during dialysis. To support this, a short overview of some of the ethical considerations will be outlined here.


Patient Care Ethics Decision-Making Guide

New resource that is available to aid staff  with using the  – a short tutorial video that walks the user through each step in the guide.


Compassion Project:

This website has many resources to support ethical care including a learning series


Case of the Month:

A website dedicated to the review of difficult ethical situations and allowing comments to be posted. The discussions are guided by 5 questions


WRHA Ethics Resources


Courses:

The following are available on LMS and you must have an account with LMS to access these opportunities:

  • Introduction to Health Ethics 
  • Introduction to Health Ethics – Online Format      
  • Level 2 Ethics Resource Workshop      
  • Managing Moral Distress in Clinical Practice      
  • The Ethics Toolkit      
  • The Shades of Grey in Community Health: Making Ethical Decisions and Managing Moral Distress

Ethics and the Care of Patients with Dementia: The Carer’s Perspective was presented on December 13, 2018. 

This webinar attempts to identify the areas of “moral stress” and distress that often confront those who care for the fragile. Its focus is the care of persons with disorders of memory, especially dementia. In this introductory presentation the notion of ethical dilemmas, and the resulting distress, are identified. Their history is tracked and practical examples on caring where they arise are presented. The hope is this first webinar will provide both a greater awareness of the nature of ethical dilemmas confronting professional caregivers and further discussions in which they can be named and then addressed.