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April 9, 2012 | News, Nutrition Articles

These are general guidelines to help lower blood cholesterol levels for people with kidney disease. Talk to your dietitian about how they fit into your specific renal diet.

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CHOOSE HEALTHIER FATS

  • Use healthier fats such as canola oil, soya oil, flax seed oil or olive oil.
  • Choose non‐hydrogenated margarine made from canola, olive or soya oil, example: Becel®, non‐hydrogenated Canola Harvest® or Olivina®.
  • Limit total amount of added fat to 2 tablespoons per day.
  • Choose oils that include omega‐3 fats such as canola, soya or flax oils and talk to your doctor about fish oil supplements.

EAT LESS SATURATED AND TRANS FATS

  • Avoid saturated fats such as butter, lard, shortening, hard or hydrogenated margarine, coconut milk, palm and coconut oil.
  • Limit saturated and trans fats, which are present in foods with “hydrogenated oil” or “partially hydrogenated oil” or “shortening”.
  • 90% of trans fats are found in commercial baked goods, snack foods and fast foods.
  • Limit creamy sauces/regular salad dressings and regular gravy.

CHOOSE LOWER‐FAT DAIRY PRODUCTS

  • Best choices: 1% or skim milk, yogurt or cottage cheese, part skim milk cheese (less than 20% M.F. or milk fat) and low fat sour cream. *Note: Dairy products are high in phosphorus. If you are on a phosphate restricted diet; limit to one ½ cup serving per day.
  • Rice drinks are a good milk substitute if you need to limit potassium or phosphorus, but choose non‐enriched as the enriched versions contain phosphorus.

SELECT LEANER CUTS OF MEATS, CHICKEN AND FISH

  • Trim fat from meat and remove skin from chicken.
  • Bake, broil, BBQ, grill, steam or microwave; avoid frying and deep‐frying.
  • Choose fish at least twice a week (fresh, frozen or low salt canned in water). Salmon, Mackerel, & Lake Trout are good sources of Omega‐3 fats.
  • Eat shellfish in moderation.
  • Eggs are nutritious and like many foods should be eaten in moderation. (Talk to your renal dietitian.)
  • Avoid: organ meats, bologna, salami, bacon, sausages and fatty cuts of meat.

LIMIT HIGH‐FAT SNACKS AND DESSERTS

  • Limit: croissants, donuts, pastries, scones, biscuits, granola, commercial muffins, chips, cheezies, chocolates, cookies, ice cream, and regular microwave popcorn.
  • Choose lower fat desserts like: angel food cake, homemade baked goods (lemon loaf & muffins), Rice Krispie® squares, sherbet, or sorbet.
  • Try snacks like: air popped popcorn sprinkled with parmesan cheese, unsalted
  • pretzels, unsalted crackers or bagel with cream cheese, vegetables with low fat
  • dip, fruit, English muffin topped with a thin layer of peanut butter or homemade
  • pancakes with applesauce.

INCREASE YOUR FIBRE

Foods that are lower in potassium and phosphorus but are higher in fibre include:

  • Fruits: canned pears or apple with the skin, berries (blackberries & raspberries), and rhubarb.
  • Vegetables: boiled carrots, corn, peas, broccoli and green beans.
  • Grains: oatmeal, limited Shredded Wheat®, Quaker Corn Bran®, Wheaties®, 60% whole wheat bread, light rye bread, Country Harvest Source One® or McGavins®

July 2010 ‐ Information adapted from Section 10 – Dyslipidemia and Chronic Kidney Disease – Essential Guide for Renal Dietitians.

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